2022 City Snapshots: Planning & Development

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This project ran June 13 to July 3, 2022. The pages can still be viewed, however the "Questions and Comments" tool is now closed. If you have any questions, please contact the City's general telephone number 604-276-4000 or email infocentre@richmond.ca.

Did you know the City has many policies and regulations to guide the use of land and buildings in the City? Learn about this and more:

  • click the image below for a snapshot
  • click the links provided on this page for more in-depth details


This project ran June 13 to July 3, 2022. The pages can still be viewed, however the "Questions and Comments" tool is now closed. If you have any questions, please contact the City's general telephone number 604-276-4000 or email infocentre@richmond.ca.

Did you know the City has many policies and regulations to guide the use of land and buildings in the City? Learn about this and more:

  • click the image below for a snapshot
  • click the links provided on this page for more in-depth details


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    I think the city needs to rethink the general rezoning policy. We have too many places with single family homes, why is that? We are dividing the residences, between the haves and the have nots, everybody needs to afford where they live.

    reginacid asked about 2 months ago

     

    Thanks for your comment.

    Over the last thirty years, Richmond has increasingly shifted away from its role as a “bedroom community” predominated by single-family houses to a community with a strong employment base and more diverse population. This shift has brought increased demand for new housing options suitable for a broad range of household types.

    In response, significant multi-family housing, including laneway houses, townhouses, and low- and high-rise apartment buildings, has been constructed and continues to be built all across Richmond, from Steveston to the City Centre to Hamilton.
    The City is updating its housing policies to require rental units in all developments containing more than 60 dwelling units (i.e. approximately 10% -15% low-end-market-rental and 15% market rental). In addition, the Official Community Plan’s targeted update, starting this year, will be taking an in-depth look at alternative housing options and initiatives, including an examination of Richmond’s existing single-family neighbourhoods and a vision for their future.
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    High rises and condos are coming up rapidly in the last couple of years. I am wondering if there are any consideration of the land and how it impacts the surrounding habitat (ie. pests, rabbits) and erosion of soil for nearby fields/ parks/ lands.

    Tyiu asked about 2 months ago

    Thanks for your question. Yes, the long range plan for the community, the Official Community Plan plans for both the conservation of some lands for habitat as well as the development of the community to provide housing, jobs and other services for people.

    On a site-by-site basis, as development is considered, there are a number of measures that aim to address these concerns. For portions of the City that have been identified as Environmentally Sensitive Areas (ESAs), a special review process through an ESA Development Permit is required to ensure new development does not cause a net loss of habitat quality. Soil and storm water conditions are reviewed with technical reports required as needed to ensure new issues are not generated through development.