2021 City Snapshots: Planning & Development

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Did you know the City has many policies and regulations to guide the use of land and buildings in the City? Learn about this and more:

  • click the image below for a snapshot
  • click the links provided on this page for more in-depth details


Did you know the City has many policies and regulations to guide the use of land and buildings in the City? Learn about this and more:

  • click the image below for a snapshot
  • click the links provided on this page for more in-depth details


Planning and Development

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    Have there been any motions from council directing staff to look at the potential benefits/ drawbacks to removing single family zoning city wide (similar to what Portland and Minneapolis have done) as well as removing mandatory parking minimums like many cities in North America are doing?

    Evan Dunfee asked 12 days ago

    City of Richmond reply: Thank you for your question. New provincial legislation requires all local governments to complete a Housing Needs Report by April 2022, with subsequent reports required every five years. The Housing Needs Report will be presented to Council at a meeting that is open to the public and the report will be published online.                                                                                                     

    The report will provide a snapshot of current housing need and a description of associated trends.  The report and associated data will inform work that is actively being undertaken by staff on a number of housing related referrals to support a diversity of housing options, including examining opportunities in established neighbourhoods and re-examining the City’s long standing single family lot size policy.                                                                                                         

    While the City continues to maintain parking minimums associated with different development types there are significant reductions in parking rates for sites located in the City Centre and in closer proximity to the Canada Line with provision for further reductions where Transportation Demand Management (TDM) measures are incorporated into developments (eg secure bicycle parking, end of trip facilities such as showers, car share spaces, bus passes, etc). These policies are reviewed and updated on a regular basis.

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    Whenever I read these overall planning reports, it all sounds so ideal. However, it does not jive with what I see in my neighbourhood (Andrews Road/No 2 Rd). The continual line of mega mansions on No 2 Rd does not seem to lead to preservation of agricultural lands or support for agriculture. The housing developments of townhomes replacing single family dwellings of less than 20 years old does not provide affordable housing for average income earners or retirees. There is an increase in public art around the city and we still do have lovely neighbourhood parks but the neighbourhoods around schools are no longer thriving active communities as everyone drives their children to school often out of their own neighbourhood.

    marymargaret asked 10 days ago

    City of Richmond reply: Thanks for your question. Following extensive review of residential policies and regulations that apply to properties in the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR), the City adopted policies and regulations that limit the size of residential development on farmland.  Currently, Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) properties in Richmond are limited to a maximum house size of 400 m2 (4,305 ft2).  The Building Permits associated with the large single-family dwellings in the Andrews Road/No. 2 Road neighbourhood were issued prior to the changes made by Council in 2018 to further limit the size of houses on farmland. 

    The City has encouraged residential densification along arterial roads through an arterial road policy since the 1999 Official Community Plan (OCP) was adopted.  The Official Community Plan (OCP) supports densification along its arterial roads for properties that are in close proximity to commercial services, public amenities, schools and transit service through the existing Arterial Road Land Use policy.  The policy supports a range of housing types including townhouse, row house, duplex/triplex, and compact lot duplex, couch house and single detached development.

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    When is the City planning to repeal the outdated 702 Lot Size Policy and get down to the important business of allowing Missing Middle Housing in the established single family neighbourhoods? There have been enough mansions built for the 1% in Richmond to last a lifetime. It’s time to allow more duplexes, triplexes, fourplexes and accessory dwelling units to repopulate these neighbourhoods with young families. This is long past due.

    Mark Sakai asked 13 days ago

    City of Richmond Reply: Thank you for your question.  New provincial legislation requires all local governments to complete a Housing Needs Report by April 2022, with subsequent reports required every five years. The Housing Needs Report will be presented to Council at a meeting that is open to the public and the report will be published online.

    The report will provide a snapshot of current housing needs and a description of associated trends. The report and associated data will inform work that is actively being undertaken by staff on a number of housing related referrals to support a diversity of housing options, including examining opportunities in established neighbourhoods and re-examining the City's long standing single family lot size policy.

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    We are an island, and if more people and condos continue in Richmond should we not have more bridges and roads out of here in case of emergencies?

    ronaldo asked 12 days ago

    City of Richmond reply: In the event an emergency is located within the City, residents can expect to be supported by City staff and resources. While the event of an entire City evacuation remains highly unlikely; coordinated emergency planning is in-place to provide direction to the public in that extremely rare event. 

    During more routine needs, evacuations and emergency accommodations are managed on a case by case basis in coordination with out public safety agencies to ensure the timely and appropriate support of our residents. 

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    There is very detailed information about the Steveston Village, waterfront and Trites area but the Steveston area plan goes north to Williams Road. What are the plans for Steveston Highway to Williams Road?

    gdn asked 12 days ago

    City of Richmond reply: Thanks for your question. The properties within the broader Steveston Planning Area (generally from Chatham Street north to Williams Road and west of the West Dyke Trail east to No. 2 Road) are primarily designated for single-family housing, although there is some provision for compact single-detached/duplex/triplex and multiple-family Housing in certain areas (e.g., arterial roads and lots containing existing multi-family housing). The area also contains public open space in the form of neighbourhood and school parks, and some pockets of commercial and institutional uses. Please see the map on page “9-70” of the Steveston Area Plan via the following link, which illustrates the land use designations in the broader Steveston Planning Area: https://www.richmond.ca/__shared/assets/steveston566.pdf

     

Page last updated: 03 October 2021, 17:52