City Snapshots: Sustainability

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Thank you for visiting City Snapshots. The question period concluded Dec. 7, 2020. Please visit other information on this page and contact the City if you have any questions.

Did you know the City helps regulate and protect environmentally sensitive areas in the City? Lean about this and more:

  • click the image below for a snapshot
  • click the links provided on this page for more in-depth details

Did you know the City helps regulate and protect environmentally sensitive areas in the City? Lean about this and more:

  • click the image below for a snapshot
  • click the links provided on this page for more in-depth details

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

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    No trees, no sustainability. What is being done to protect old growth and how is green cover being balanced, protected and promoted amidst construction.

    Rey asked 6 months ago

    The City is doing several things to ensure Richmond’s forests are protected. The City’s Official Community Plan, Zoning Bylaws, and associated policies like its Ecological Network Management Strategy establish the framework for how our natural areas are managed. 

    The City’s urban forest exists on both private and public lands and makes up an important part of our Ecological Network. Guidelines for development in Environmental Sensitive Areas and Riparian Management Areas have been established in key areas and along corridors in the City to reduce impacts from development. Tree retention is sought during the development process where possible. The Tree Protection Bylaw No. 8057 restricts tree removal from private lands and ensures replacements are provided when trees are required to be removed.  Additionally, in 2019, Council adopted the Public Tree Management Strategy 2045,  which demonstrates the City’s continued commitment to maintaining a healthy urban forest and the prudent management of the conservation, management, and expansion of the City’s urban forest. Please email us at parks@richmond.ca if you would like more information. Thanks.  -CT

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    I think environmental protection is very important. I recently saw aerial photographs of the area outside the western dike from the '70's and today showing the marshy reedy area has shrunk immensely in this time. What plans are there to restore this area?

    gdn asked 6 months ago

    The area you are referring to makes up part of Sturgeon Bank. Sturgeon Bank is primarily owned and managed by the province of BC and is designated as a Wildlife Management Area under the provincial Wildlife Act. The City partnered with Ducks Unlimited Canada in 2012 to purchase a large (51-hectare / 127-acre) privately-owned parcel of in Sturgeon Bank, commonly referred to as the Grauer Lands. Restoration efforts to this important habitat have involved efforts to maintain and improve fish passage. Council also recently supported a provincial application, that if successful, would aim to restore natural conditions that support healthy vegetation on Sturgeon Bank.